DHV:
144
Tourin ID:
BRUS 10

15..

Tenor

Heinrich

Ebert ?

# of Strings:

6

Place Made:

I, Venice

Body Shape:

Viol

Current Location:

B, Brussels

Sound Holes:

F

Collection:

Musée des instruments de musique

Head:

Scroll

Catalog Number:

1402

Label Text:

Hainrich Ebert [printed]

Measurements:

Body Length:

43

String Length:

43.0- 47.0

Rib Depth:

9

Upper Width:

Middle Width:

Bottom Width:

21.6

13.6

24.2

Previous Owner:

Count Pietro Correr, Venice, -1886

Information Source:

Moens 2002, pp. 104-08; Moens 1995, pp. 192-207; Moens 1987a, pp. 6-10; PT visits 6/77 & 9/78

Literature:

Photographs:

Recordings:

Auctions:

Comments:

Moens 2002, pp. 104-08; Moens 1995, pp. 192-207; Edmunds 1994, pp. 21-22; Otterstedt 1994, pp. 143-4; Moens 1989, pp. 46-47; Woodfield 1984, pp. 125-27; Edmunds 1980, pp. 75, 80-81; Mahillon 1900, 3:41

On museum’s website (front [color]); Moens 2002, pp. 105-07; Moens 1995, pp. 193, 196, 198, 201-02, 205 (FB+S, label, inside of front, interior details, neck and head side); Moens 1987a, pp. 7-8 (same as 1995); Edmunds 1994, p. 22 (with table removed); Otterstedt 1994, p. 144 (table); Moens 1989, pp. 46-47; Woodfield 1984, p. 126 (front; with table removed); Paganelli 1966/1970, p. 85 (front); Mahillon 1900, 3:42 (front)

Museum’s website : treble viol, date 1560/1570 (”incertaine”); Mahillon 1900: dessus de viole, mid-17th C. Edmunds 1980: tenor viol; string length originally 52-55 cm, other dimensions 42.5, 25.5/-/21.5, 10.2. Moens 2002: tenor viol; uses old parts, probably from an early 17th-C. Alpine bass violin; “a premeditated intention to imitate a historical state that never existed.” Moens 1995: many suspicious features; probably made by cutting down a larger instrument (note 2-piece neck). Moens 1989: dendrochronology suggests table no older than 1580; its arching and outline fit exactly between the soundholes of a small double bass. Back has also been cut down from something larger (open worm holes); ribs may have been rebent; fingerboard has been narrowed and shortened. Otterstedt 1994: 1580 date assumes no loss of perimeter wood, but this is an unsafe assumption; viol has been open since 1960s, and table has gradually reverted to original arching; ribs cracked in places from rebending cold so as not to harm existing varnish; neck and pegbox perhaps carved from an existing cello neck. Edmunds 1994: original barrel-vaulted table replaced with a carved one, probably in early 17C.