DHV:
954
Tourin ID:

Size:

Bass

Label Text:

Place Made:

GB, London (Southwark)

Maker:

Henry

Jaye

Date:

1615

HENRIE JAYE IN / SOUTHWARKE / -1615- [printed except 1615, inside treble middle rib; same text handwritten inside back]

Body Shape:

Festoon

Current Location:

GB, Manchester

Sound Holes:

Other

Collection:

Royal Northern College of Music

No. of Strings:

6

Catalog Number:

V3

Head:

Female

Previous Owner:

Henry Watson, Manchester, -1900;

Measurements:

Body Length:

64.5

String Length:

Rib Depth:

12.5

Upper Width:

32

Middle Width:

23.5

Bottom Width:

37.5

Information Source:

Waterhouse 2010, p. 149; TGM visit 10/01; Waterhouse 1998; Bevan 1990, pp. 89-90

Literature:

Photographs:

Recordings:

Auctions:

Comments:

Waterhouse 2010, p. 149; Gartrell 2009, pp. 8, 125-26; Fleming 2007, p. 30 (JP 14); Gartrell 2003, p. 124; Waterhouse 1998; Bevan 1990, pp. 89-90; Pearce 1866, p. 47

Gartrell 2009, p. 126 (front from below); [by TGM: F+S, rear view with back off; labels (color)]

Waterhouse 1998/2010: converted to cello in 1823 (interior inscriptions). Previously attributed to Gasparo da Salo (see Bevan 1990). Dimensions are of back: 2-piece, hardwood (now detached, badly warped and cracked, completely relined); table 1-piece, with 2 separate hook-shaped sound holes on each side, pointing in opposite directions (baryton-style); also relined, badly warped and cracked; both have inked purfling. (Overall, “about 200 small patches of wood and fabric inside the belly, and another 50 around the ribs.”) Pegbox, bridge, fingerboard, and tailpiece cello-style but for 6 strings; 19C-style bass bar. Pegs perhaps older than 19C, but don’t match: 2 oak, 3 sycamore, 1 rosewood. French-style head, c. 1730/40, grafted to pegbox. Body length actually 65.0, disregarding indentation at bottom block; rib height probably includes thickness of table and back. Inscription inside right side ribs: “This violoncello was given [by?] Mr. Newcomb School Master of Martchington Staffordshire to Henry Richd. Rice school Master of Doveridge in the year of our Lord 1821 & by him entirely Repaired”; also on end block: “This violoncello was entirely New worked. The back and a new neck put on it, and re-made up by H.R. Rice of Doveridge 1823.” Probably same as one mentioned by Pearce 1866, who saw and heard a Jaye viol dated 1615 converted into a small cello.