DHV:
636
Tourin ID:
MUNB 07

Size:

Bass

Label Text:

Place Made:

D, Hamburg

Maker:

Joachim

Tielke

Date:

1708

IOACHIM TIELKE // in Hamburg, An. 1708 [small format, printed except 708, altered from printed 16--]

Body Shape:

Viol

Current Location:

D, Munich

Sound Holes:

C

Collection:

Deutsches Museum

No. of Strings:

7

Catalog Number:

41556

Head:

Lion

Previous Owner:

Theodor Einstein & Co., Munich, -1914; Rosenberg, Paris; Christian Hammer, Stockholm, -1893

Measurements:

Body Length:

58.3

String Length:

60.5

Rib Depth:

11.6

Upper Width:

27.9

Middle Width:

20.4

Bottom Width:

34.1

Information Source:

Hellwig 2011, pp. 362-63; Wackernagel 1997, pp. 265-66; PT visit 9/78

Literature:

Photographs:

Recordings:

Auctions:

Comments:

Hellwig 2011, pp. 362-63; Wackernagel 1997, pp. 265-66; Hellwig 1980, p. 311; Thomas 1978, p. 26; Hammer 1893, no. 1340

Hellwig 2011, p. 363 (front [color]); Wackernagel 1997, p. 265 (front); Hammer 1893, no. 1340 (front 7/8)

Hellwig 2011, TieWV 158; Hellwig 1980, no. 126: 2-piece table with painted double “purfling”; 2-piece back (flat with fold) with (faded) painted “purfling”. Neck, pegbox, head, fingerboard, and tailpiece not original; varnish probably completely stripped off. Dimensions 59.1, 27.5/19.7/33.7, 11.5, -. Wackernagel 1997: fake label, on paper datable to 3Q19C; instrument’s origin early 18th C. in Tielke’s circle. Flat back with fold, unlike Tielke’s norm. 2-piece table and back, both with painted purfling. Crossbars on back not original. Head reminiscent of those on genuine Tielke viols, but differing in various details. Other decoration (on pegbox and neck foot), however, is very similar to his work. Restoration from cello to gamba probably by Neuner & Hornsteiner, Mittenwald. Dimensions 58.9, 27.5/19.7/33.7, 11.7, 59.7. Hellwig 2011 adds: bass bar (with horizontal growth rings) might be original; neck, head, and pegbox probably an older copy; narrowed for use as a cello, later skillfully rewidened; all fittings probably by Neuner & Hornsteiner, 1914. Back widths 27.4/19.7/33.6. Dendrochoronology (P. Klein, 1984) gives dates of 1698 (treble) and 1700 (bass) for youngest growth rings on table. Carvings on neck heel and pegbox stylistically doubtful, thus authenticity of head also in question; but all are one piece of wood with neck. Date of 1708 (on late 19th-C label) unlikely because of flat back with fold, a feature otherwise found before the mid-1690s or after 1717. One of half a dozen unusually small instruments, perhaps made for use at high pitch.